the big bowl that could

Working in ceramics results in a lot of "win some , you lose some" and throwing away hours of effort due to breakage or some thing you stupidly didn't take into consideration. This bowl was a big mess of stupid things, and I re-built it twice after having it break and crumble during the drying process.

I realized the problem was that I was building it onto the underside of a bowl as a form to follow, and as it would shrink it cracked and fell apart.I tried taking what was left (after I had started from scratch a few times), and jamming it into the inside of the bowl to try and make it work. I knew it was probably a lost cause, but figured it was an experiment. I had just started working with paperclay, which is touted as having many forgiving qualities. It has a high ratio of paper mixed into the clay body, which burns off during firing, leaving a lightweight but sting result that looks just like any other clay ceramic. Supposedly you can build onto dried or even fired clay with it. So I took the broken shell I had and applied a thin skin of paper clay on one side.

After firing the original red clay had cracked considerably, so I then patched it with more paperclay. Being lazy and not sure if this would work, I then glazed it before firing again. The many cracks and patches are visible, but not obvious under the glaze. I'm not crazy about the glaze result, so I may re-fire it. And if you're wondering why on earth I would make a bowl with holes in it, it's meant to be a fruit bowl - the holes let air in and prevent rot.


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Looked great, until it dried and cracked....

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here I put a skin of paperclay, to try and reinforce it

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and this is what it looked like when I turned it over.

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There was so much rebuilding involved, I would have been better off to start over. But I considered it a learning experience!